But it is a market where you can go .500

It’s not a market where you can go young.

- Omar Minaya, on New York.

Man, this gets my ire up. You know what I’d like, just once? I’d like to root for a team that doesn’t worry about what type of market it’s in and instead concerns itself only with putting together a winning ballclub.

I wish I could run an experiment. Me and another GM get identical teams in identical cities with identical situations. The other GM has to worry about selling tickets in the particular market, pleasing the press and appeasing the offseason whims of the fan base. Me, I just focus on putting the best possible baseball team on the field.

Who do you think sells more tickets in the end? Whose network gets better ratings? Whose ballpark ads yield more money? Which GM then has more revenue to invest back in the team, in free agents, the farm system, the draft and international scouting?

20 thoughts on “But it is a market where you can go .500

  1. I like Will Davidian’s idea that he put on the Twitter last night: give a real GM the opportunity to tweak the Mets’ roster on MLB The Show. Could prove hilarious and/or depressing.

  2. whats the context for the quote? because standing alone it is totally stupid. theres a great market for young talent if omar would only overslot in the draft like any rational decision maker in his position would do.

    what a dummy. the sooner he’s removed from power the better.

      • Here’s the link:

        http://tinyurl.com/23ux8lm

        It also features some quotes from (of course) Jeff Francoeur about how he tries to keep everyone upbeat, but sometimes goes home and says “What do I do?”

        Um, start with trying to get on base 30 percent of the time?

      • All jokes aside, i would like to see the entire context. You do need to know what he means by “go young”. B/c if someone is asking him about a complete rebuild, like trading off all the big names like Santana, Beltran, Reyes etc, then I think Omar is right, you can’t and dont really need to do that in such a big market with a big payroll.

      • I agree that’s a foolish move. But that’s because of the specific circumstances of this specific team. But the idea that you can NEVER go young because a lot of people live in the city you play your home games and it might anger the Tim Smiths of the world is always a bad idea.

      • The context doesn’t really provide any clues. It looks like they just copied and pasted his quotes into the article randomly around their own separate statements.

        “GM Minaya feels the heat

        Minaya has made for a convenient target.

        He has been accused over his six years as GM of favoring Latin American players, trading prospects and even firing manager Willie Randolph at the wrong time — 3 a.m. ET on a 2008 trip to Anaheim, angering area news media.

        There have been personnel mistakes, most notably re-signing starter Oliver Perez to a three-year, $36 million deal before the 2009 season. Perez has been injured, ineffective (3-8, 6.77 ERA) and this year refused a minor league assignment.

        Minaya won’t publicly identify mistakes during his tenure.

        “As a general manager, everybody does that,” he says. “I come from a scouting mentality. I’m not afraid to make mistakes. There are people who make decisions, and there are people who are afraid to make decisions.”

        The Mets have plenty of decisions in front of them.

        As Minaya says, “It’s not a market where you can go young. You have to bring in players.”

        The Mets have gone younger out of necessity this year, thanks to injuries and subpar performances by some players. Rookie Jon Niese is in the starting rotation. Hard-throwing Bobby Parnell, 25, is auditioning as a possible replacement for Rodriguez.

        Three rookies have become regulars on offense: first baseman Ike Davis, catcher Josh Thole and second baseman Ruben Tejada. Outfielder Angel Pagan has become a full-timer and maintained the .300 batting average he produced as a backup in 2009.

        And, Darling says, with failure must come accountability.

        “This team has to be brutally honest with the fan base,” Darling says. “If you got knocked around, don’t say, ‘Well, I thought I made some good pitches.’ The fans around here know better.”

        There’s no certain way to measure how much the play on the field is affected by the rest of life around the Mets. But they were 56-57 at the time of the Rodriguez incident, 9-8 since.

        “We’re much better than we’ve shown,” Francoeur says. “That’s the disappointment.””

  3. I’m not sure Omar means that or even understands what he’s saying. I feel like he has a list of 10 cliches GMs are supposed to use and he breaks them out when they seem appropriate.

    Like when he says they’re going to build around “pitching and defense” and then doesn’t acquire a single player to meet either goal.

  4. It’s not a market where you can go young…but it’s a market where you can give 2000 at bats to crappy old replacement level players? I mean does Omar actually think the market would prefer to see Frenchy run out there than young players who don’t have 3000 PA’s that say they suck?

    Of course there’s also the fact they’re continuing to run out probably the least useful young player we have in Tejada everyday.

  5. But to play devils advocate. DePodesta might be proof of the market/media’s possible affects on your job security. Though when a teams been as bad as the mets have been recently I imagine there’s no moves they could make that would cause them to get any more flack than they’ve already gotten.

    I used to give Omar some reprieve because I figured with the media obsessiveness of the Wilpons certain moves, like going young, would get him fired, but given that everyones retained their jobs despite the parade of media disasters this team has had in the last 2 years I’m not sure an Isiah like sex scandal would get him fired. At this point I’m just convinced that everyone, from Hojo up to Jeffie, including all the scouts, stats guys, business and economic forecasters/analysts, PR guys they have must just all be really bad at their jobs if the organization is legitimately convinced that replacing Jeff Francoeur with Nick Evans/Lucas Duda platoon, or if they actually thought swapping Barajas for Thole, was going to hurt attendance more than the 15% decrease they’ve already seen.

  6. It’s a different sport, but you basically described the New Jersey Devils. Same market, no less.

    “I’d like to root for a team that doesn’t worry about what type of market it’s in and instead concerns itself only with putting together a winning (ball)club.”

  7. I’m sorry…I get to these stories late now that I seem just swamped at work.

    But…ummm…what?! It’s not a market that you can young…but it’s a market you can have a $12 million gym rat. Come. On. Think before you speak Omar…uhhh you know what I’m sayin.

    Comments like this frustrate me so much…it’s incredible how out of touch with reality the people who run this team are.

    • It’s not even the most infuriating comment from the interview

      “Minaya won’t publicly identify mistakes during his tenure.

      “As a general manager, everybody does that,” he says. “I come from a scouting mentality. I’m not afraid to make mistakes. There are people who make decisions, and there are people who are afraid to make decisions.””

  8. “There are people who make decisions and there are people who are afraid to make decisions.”

    Hahaha. You can guarantee the next time I make a mistake I’m dropping this line to see if it sounds as asinine out loud as it does when I read it.

    Oh Omar.

  9. With all the money Omar has tied up in over the hill players, and players who have higher estimations of their ability than the rest of the world, what choice does he have other than going young? Players like Davis, Thole and Niese all seem like they will learn and mature from this season of adversity, and if Omar is still around they can all look forward to getting huge paychecks when they can no longer play.

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